For a better experience rotate your phone.
For a better experience rotate your tablet.

Scroll for results ↓

This is the first response.
This is the second response.
This is the third response.
Now let's see who you would let into Canada...

Learn more -
what others think and some facts!

Who would you welcome into Canada?

This is the first response.
This is the second response.
This is the third response.

Want to build a better Canada?
Tell us what you think.
Compare your views to other Canadians.
Understand the facts.

Thought Patterns explores who we are as Canadians, and who we want to be. We invite you to take part in this first Thought Patterns conversation about immigration, and share your perspective. Your views matter, and policy and decision-makers are interested in them. We will share our overall findings publicly (only non-identifying information is collected and shared).

Thought Patterns is brought to you by the Century Initiative.

Let's get started.

Thought Patterns will take about 5 minutes of your time. Let’s find out what you think (and feel) about new Canadians.

Here we go,
tell us a bit about yourself.

All fields required, except postal code.

Please enter a valid postal code. For example: E2E 2A9

I was born in
I identify as
I was
My parents were born in Canada
My grandparents were born in Canada
My postal code is

Immigrants make it harder for young people to find jobs.

Strongly
Disagree
Neither Agree
nor Disagree
Strongly
Agree
...thinking...
Hmm? Something went wrong, please try again.
< Back

Immigrants pay taxes and this strengthens our social programs.

Strongly
Disagree
Neither Agree
nor Disagree
Strongly
Agree
...thinking...
Hmm? Something went wrong, please try again.
< Back

Immigration places too much strain on our social welfare programs.

Strongly
Disagree
Neither Agree
nor Disagree
Strongly
Agree
...thinking...
Hmm? Something went wrong, please try again.
< Back

Immigrants work hard to fit into Canadian society.

Strongly
Disagree
Neither Agree
nor Disagree
Strongly
Agree
...thinking...
Hmm? Something went wrong, please try again.
< Back

Immigrants are beneficial to Canada's economy.

Strongly
Disagree
Neither Agree
nor Disagree
Strongly
Agree
...thinking...
Hmm? Something went wrong, please try again.
< Back

Immigration helps grow the Canadian economy.

Strongly
Disagree
Neither Agree
nor Disagree
Strongly
Agree
...thinking...
Hmm? Something went wrong, please try again.
< Back

Immigrants take jobs from people I know.

Strongly
Disagree
Neither Agree
nor Disagree
Strongly
Agree
...thinking...
Hmm? Something went wrong, please try again.
< Back

We should not admit immigrants from countries associated with terrorism.

Strongly
Disagree
Neither Agree
nor Disagree
Strongly
Agree
...thinking...
Hmm? Something went wrong, please try again.
< Back

Immigrants enrich my community.

Strongly
Disagree
Neither Agree
nor Disagree
Strongly
Agree
...thinking...
Hmm? Something went wrong, please try again.
< Back

Immigration places too much strain on our education systems.

Strongly
Disagree
Neither Agree
nor Disagree
Strongly
Agree
...thinking...
Hmm? Something went wrong, please try again.
< Back

Immigration places too much strain on our health programs.

Strongly
Disagree
Neither Agree
nor Disagree
Strongly
Agree
...thinking...
Hmm? Something went wrong, please try again.
< Back

In the long term, immigration will make Canada more prosperous.

Strongly
Disagree
Neither Agree
nor Disagree
Strongly
Agree
...thinking...
Hmm? Something went wrong, please try again.
< Back

Canada is good at integrating immigrants.

Strongly
Disagree
Neither Agree
nor Disagree
Strongly
Agree
...thinking...
Hmm? Something went wrong, please try again.
< Back

Immigrants force too many accommodations on our society.

Strongly
Disagree
Neither Agree
nor Disagree
Strongly
Agree
...thinking...
Hmm? Something went wrong, please try again.
< Back

There is not enough security screening of immigrants.

Strongly
Disagree
Neither Agree
nor Disagree
Strongly
Agree
...thinking...
Hmm? Something went wrong, please try again.
< Back

Current Change:

Economic: 0

Social Programs: 0

Social Integration: 0

Management: 0

Thank you!
Your voice has been heard.

Here’s what your responses say about you:

Did we get it right?
How would you express your feelings on immigration in Canada?

Thank you for letting us know.

Thought Patterns
Close
Jobs
Benefits
Community
Safety

jobs: The economic impact of immigration.

You believe immigrants have a negative impact on jobs, most Canadians believe immigration is good for the economy.

Immigrants start
Businesses

In fact, immigrants start more businesses than Canadian born citizens do. In 2010, approx. 6% of longer term immigrants were owners of private companies compared with 5% of Canadian born citizens.

Immigrants create
Jobs

Immigrants create jobs. In 2010, total employment in private businesses owned by immigrants entering Canada between the years 2000 and 2009 was 89,430.

Immigrants grow
GDP

Immigration helps Canada's GDP. Without immigration, GDP is projected to grow at an average annual rate of 0.6% through the year 2100. If immigration levels grow such that the population reaches 100 million by the year 2100, GDP growth is forecasted to be a much stronger 2.6% per year.

Source

Economic Analysis, Conference Board of Canada, 2017

In fact, immigrants start more businesses than Canadian born citizens do. In 2010, approx. 6% of longer term immigrants were owners of private companies compared with 5% of Canadian born citizens.

Immigrants create jobs. In 2010, total employment in private businesses owned by immigrants entering Canada between the years 2000 and 2009 was 89,430.

Immigration helps Canada's GDP. Without immigration, GDP is projected to grow at an average annual rate of 0.6% through the year 2100. If immigration levels grow such that the population reaches 100 million by the year 2100, GDP growth is forecasted to be a much stronger 2.6% per year.

Source

Economic Analysis, Conference Board of Canada, 2017

ben·e·fits: The impact of immigration on Canada’s social services and support systems.

You believe immigrants are a burden on Canada's social services and support systems, most Canadians agree. The facts show many important ways new Canadians contribute to Canada’s safety net.

Immigrants are
Healthier

Immigrants are healthier than are people born here, which means new Canadians are significant net contributors to the affordability of Canadian healthcare. With steady increases in immigration to reach 100 million new Canadians by 2100, healthcare spending is projected to fall from 34.5% to 29.2% of the provincial budget, an annual savings equal to $21 billion in today’s dollars.

Source

First sentence http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-003-x/2011004/article/11588-eng.htm
Second sentence [Economic Analysis, Conference Board of Canada, 2016]

Foreign students add
$11.4 Billion

In 2014, international student spending amounted to $11.4 billion dollars, including school fees, accommodation and living expenses. This translates to a $9.3 billion dollar after-tax contribution to Canada’s GDP, and 122,700 jobs supported in the Canadian economy.

Immigrants
Pay Taxes & CPP

New Canadians pay taxes and contribute to the CPP (Canadian Pension Plan). Tax revenue is directed toward many things, including the country’s education system, hospitals, parks, libraries, and infrastructure.

Immigrants are healthier than are people born here, which means new Canadians are significant net contributors to the affordability of Canadian healthcare. With steady increases in immigration to reach 100 million new Canadians by 2100, healthcare spending is projected to fall from 34.5% to 29.2% of the provincial budget, an annual savings equal to $21 billion in today’s dollars.

Source

First sentence http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-003-x/2011004/article/11588-eng.htm
Second sentence [Economic Analysis, Conference Board of Canada, 2016]

In 2014, international student spending amounted to $11.4 billion dollars, including school fees, accommodation and living expenses. This translates to a $9.3 billion dollar after-tax contribution to Canada’s GDP, and 122,700 jobs supported in the Canadian economy.

New Canadians pay taxes and contribute to the CPP (Canadian Pension Plan). Tax revenue is directed toward many things, including the country’s education system, hospitals, parks, libraries, and infrastructure.

com·mu·ni·ty: The ability of new Canadians to integrate into Canadian society.

You believe immigrants negatively impact your community, most Canadians agree. Consider the following:

Diverse
Knowledge & Culture

Diversity creates new learning opportunities for Canadians and new business opportunities for the information and cultural industries. TV channels in Toronto, for example, employ people to broadcast in Mandarin, Cantonese, Italian, Punjabi, Portuguese, Arabic and other languages.

Diverse
Business Perspective

Diversity in the workplace makes sense from a business perspective. Companies in the top quartile for diversity are 35% more likely to have above average financial returns for their industry, in Canada, Latin America, the United Kingdom and the United States.

Source

https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/organization/our-insights/why-diversity-matters

Immigrants are
overrepresented in
STEM

Immigrants are overrepresented in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). Among male university graduates under age 35, 46% of new Canadians have STEM degrees compared to 32% of males born in Canada. For women, 23% of new Canadians have a STEM degree compared to 13% of women born in Canada. STEM degrees are critical to Canada’s economic prosperity.

Source

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75-006-x/2013001/article/11874/immi-eng.htm

Diversity creates new learning opportunities for Canadians and new business opportunities for the information and cultural industries. TV channels in Toronto, for example, employ people to broadcast in Mandarin, Cantonese, Italian, Punjabi, Portuguese, Arabic and other languages.

Diversity in the workplace makes sense from a business perspective. Companies in the top quartile for diversity are 35% more likely to have above average financial returns for their industry, in Canada, Latin America, the United Kingdom and the United States.

Source

https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/organization/our-insights/why-diversity-matters

Immigrants are overrepresented in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). Among male university graduates under age 35, 46% of new Canadians have STEM degrees compared to 32% of males born in Canada. For women, 23% of new Canadians have a STEM degree compared to 13% of women born in Canada. STEM degrees are critical to Canada’s economic prosperity.

Source

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75-006-x/2013001/article/11874/immi-eng.htm

safe·ty: Canada's ability to admit and process new arrivals and the resulting safety of your neighbourhood.

You believe immigrants are a threat to Canada's safety, most Canadians agree. The facts demonstrate new Canadians enhance the safety of our communities.

Immigrant rich areas are
Safer

Studies have shown that immigrant rich areas are safer. Nationally, every 10% increase of the share of immigrants in an area lowers the property crime rate by 2 to 3 percent. Statistics Canada's Toronto crime data found that, all else being equal, the higher the number of new Canadians in a given area, the lower the level of violent crime.

Immigrant youth have a
Lower Crime Rate

In a study spanning 20+ years of immigration into the greater Toronto area, the rate of "youthful illegalities" (marijuana consumption, fights, stealing cars, petty theft) was found to be significantly lower amongst the immigrant cohort.

Refugees Are
Not a Terrorist Threat

CATO Institute's study of U.S. terrorist attacks emphasizes that there is a 0.00003% chance of dying in an attack by a foreign-born terrorist and a 0.00000003% chance of dying in an attack by a refugee.

Studies have shown that immigrant rich areas are safer. Nationally, every 10% increase of the share of immigrants in an area lowers the property crime rate by 2 to 3 percent. Statistics Canada's Toronto crime data found that, all else being equal, the higher the number of new Canadians in a given area, the lower the level of violent crime.

In a study spanning 20+ years of immigration into the greater Toronto area, the rate of "youthful illegalities" (marijuana consumption, fights, stealing cars, petty theft) was found to be significantly lower amongst the immigrant cohort.

CATO Institute's study of U.S. terrorist attacks emphasizes that there is a 0.00003% chance of dying in an attack by a foreign-born terrorist and a 0.00000003% chance of dying in an attack by a refugee.

Learn more -
what others think and some facts!

Who would you welcome into Canada?